The Best Things to Do This Week, According to Our Editors: March 28

This week we have brunch, breakfast, books and more!

1. Pop Over to the Milwaukee Public Library

BRIANNA SCHUBERT, ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR

Though I’ve lived in Milwaukee for a little over four years now, I only got my Milwaukee Public Library card this year (hello post-college-graduation free-time). I couldn’t believe what I was missing out on! I have made it a habit to go to the library about once a week, and I peruse the new fiction books, the nonfiction aisles and the fun displays the librarians put out – my favorite at the East Branch being a “Straight Outta the Book Return” display, which is always heaping with great reads. In my most recent visit, I was also excited to see that one section of the nonfiction books highlighted stories of women by women, turning all of the other books around to make them stand out for Women’s History Month. 

2. Pig Out at the Crafty Cow

CHRIS DROSNER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

An impromptu Sunday brunch trip to the six-month-old Wauwatosa location of the Crafty Cow left me wanting to try so many things on the menu that I can’t wait to go back. I settled on the Hot Boy, with two patties of breaded and sauced Nashville hot chicken, gravy, an egg and sliced pickles (essential!) on a great buttermilk biscuit. The spice level on the chicken is not for the faint of heart, but it all works together wonderfully – a true flavor bomb. Friendly staff and a well curated tap list were the icing on the savory cake.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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3. Read How to Write Like Tolstoy

ARCHER PARQUETTE, MANAGING EDITOR

Right off the bat, the one bad thing about this book is the misleading title. It’s not really about Tolstoy, and it’s definitely not a manual for aping his style (which would be an odd choice in 2022). This book, written by Richard Cohen, a veteran literary editor, peels back the layers of dozens of the best fiction writers living and dead, like Chekov, Dickens, Zadie Smith, Hemingway, etc., and breaks down what makes their fiction work (or not work). What makes an ending memorable? Why does some dialogue sound clunky and some sound perfect? How do characters come to life on the page? It’s all insightful stuff and highly entertaining for readers or writers of fiction.

4. Go Out for Breakfast

ANN CHRISTENSON, SENIOR DINING EDITOR

Weekend breakfast – more than my weekday bowl of oatmeal – is a passion of mine. Somebody else making my pancakes and eggs makes me feel like I’ve got a lucky penny in my pocket. On a recent Saturday while my niece was home for spring break, we braved the crowds at Sweet Diner in the Third Ward (239 E. Chicago St.). I like both sweet and savory in the morning, so the veggie omelet with a side of buttermilk pancakes was right up my alley. My niece went for achingly sweet, ordering the cinnamon roll French toast. Were we happy? Definitely.     

5. Sing and Dance at Angelo’s Piano Lounge

ALLI WATTERS, EDITOR, DIGITAL AND CULTURE EDITOR

After a few games of pinball at Up Down MKE, my friend took me to her favorite bar a couple blocks away. It was a spot that I had never been to – or even heard of – before. Angelo’s Piano Lounge is a small bar on Van Buren Street, and with its dive bar feel, it’s unlike any piano bar I’ve ever been to. The space is small enough that you instantly bond with everyone in the room as you sing (and in our case dance) to all of your favorite songs. The pianist takes requests and also allows some karaoke, if you’re up for braving the mic. I left with a hoarse voice and plans to come back sometime very soon. 

Angelos Piano Bar; Photo by Allison Watters

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