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We highlight some of the new and novel in the post-facelift era for the Milwaukee Public Museum’s beloved exhibit.

The designers and curators at the Milwaukee Public Museum have admitted they were prepared for pitchforks from the public if they messed with the 50-year-old “Streets of Old Milwaukee” exhibit. It doesn’t seem, though, that they have much to fear.

Director of Exhibits and Design Julian Jackson tells the magazine his team worked hard to strike a balance in using technology to enhance the experience of the time period rather than disrupt it. You can be the judge when the Streets reopen on Dec. 11.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris.

1. The streets will have an app, “Streets of Old Milwaukee,” which visitors can use to select from a rotating cast of MKE composite characters who act as audio guides through the streets. The app uses bluetooth technology so that it can tell where you are in the exhibit, meaning there’s no set route.

2. The streetcar marks the entrance to the exhibit. From the car’s interior, visitors will see animated Milwaukee scenes that move from present to past.

3. Next to the streetcar is the North Side Lumber & Fuel building (now Bliffert Lumber & Hardware). MPM designers scavenged the lumber company’s original building for materials before the company was set to tear it down. Hot tip: Train your nose to pick up the scent of freshly cut wood.

The H. Kuhm General Store still stands, but now visitors can step inside and take a closer look at its goods, like materials from the Johnston candy-making company. Photo by Adam Ryan Morris.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris.

The H. Kuhm General Store still stands, but now visitors can step inside and take a closer look at its goods, like materials from the Johnston candy-making company.

‘Street View’ appears in the December 2015 issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

Find the December issue on newsstands Nov. 30.

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