Dancing Queen

Sure, this is the city of ethnic festivals, but if you want to dig deep into international ideas, there’s Nora Chipaumire’s dance-theater piece Miriam. Offered by Alverno Presents and the Lynden Sculpture Garden, Chipaumire’s outdoor performance – using the garden’s landscape to striking effect – is inspired by her childhood in Zimbabwe, and also draws ideas from the colonial novels of Joseph Conrad and the liberating music of Miriam Makeba. In 2012, The New York Times called her “an artist of ferocious intensity.” Miriam (July 13). Lynden Sculpture Garden. 2145 W. Brown Deer Rd., 414-446-8794, alvernopresents.alverno.edu. Comments comments

Sure, this is the city of ethnic festivals, but if you want to dig deep into international ideas, there’s Nora Chipaumire’s dance-theater piece Miriam. Offered by Alverno Presents and the Lynden Sculpture Garden, Chipaumire’s outdoor performance – using the garden’s landscape to striking effect – is inspired by her childhood in Zimbabwe, and also draws ideas from the colonial novels of Joseph Conrad and the liberating music of Miriam Makeba. In 2012, The New York Times called her “an artist of ferocious intensity.”

Miriam (July 13). Lynden Sculpture Garden. 2145 W. Brown Deer Rd., 414-446-8794, alvernopresents.alverno.edu.

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Paul Kosidowski is a freelance writer and critic who contributes regularly to Milwaukee Magazine, WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio and national arts magazines. He writes weekly reviews and previews for the Culture Club column. He was literary director of the Milwaukee Repertory Theater from 1999-2006. In 2007, he was a fellow with the NEA Theater and Musical Theater Criticism Institute at the University of Southern California. His writing has also appeared in American Theatre magazine, Backstage, The Boston Globe, Theatre Topics, and Isthmus (Madison, Wis.). He has taught theater history, arts criticism and magazine writing at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.