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America's Black Holocaust Museum is uniting people throughout Greater Milwaukee with its annual gathering for racial repair and reconciliation.

America’s Black Holocaust Museum aims to increase public awareness of the sordid history of slavery and encourage racial repair, healing and reconciliation. The museum is currently online-only, but ABHM hopes to open a brick-and-mortar location in Milwaukee in the near future. The site offers galleries that educate visitors on African American history and news updates that cover the present-day struggle for racial equality.

The newest online exhibit, “Peering Through White-Rimmed Glasses: A Letter to My Fellow White Americans” by Dr. Fran Kaplan, examines the ongoing endurance of anti-black bias and discrimination in the U.S. The exhibit delves into how a “White Racial Frame” developed in the early 1600s and has become deeply ingrained in white American culture, causing sixteen generations of white children to grow up in the presence of anti-black/pro-white behavior and rhetoric. Kaplan concludes the exhibit with suggestions on what can be done to change the racial hierarchy we inherited and make America a peaceful place to live for everyone.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Fran Kaplan, Coordinator, America’s Black Holocaust Virtual Museum

On Sat., Feb. 25, ABHM will hold its annual Founder’s Day Gathering to celebrate the legacy of founder Dr. James Cameron. This year’s topic, “Let’s Face It: How Communities Remember and Repair Racial Trauma” will explore how America should memorialize some of the most sinister chapters of our racial history, how that commemoration might aid or harm victims, perpetrators and bystanders, and what role institutions and museums should play in the work of memory and racial healing. Tickets for the event, which will be held at Centennial Hall (733 N. 8th St.), are $14 for adults and $10 for students.

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