Where to Reserve Tickets for Entertainment in Milwaukee

Do you have a reservation.

To get into the Milwaukee Public Museum these days, you’ll need to make sure you’re on the list. Not because the museum has reimagined itself as an exclusive nightclub with a VIP-only entrance policy. But because it’s found a way to stay open while helping its employees and visitors follow social distancing guidelines – by offering timed tickets. 

Several other MKE-area museums and entertainment venues have taken similar measures. We’re sharing a few of our favorites here, along with info on what they’re doing to keep their patrons happy and healthy. 

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Rec Room Craft Co. has limited its instructor-led workshops, which take place within stumbling distance of the venue’s delightfully retro bar, to 8-10 people for the time being. And crafty Cream Citizens who would like to be especially careful can also pick up DIY crafting kits curbside. 

Much like the MPM, the Charles Allis Art Museum and the Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum are also currently open by appointment only. So if you’ve ever wanted to wander around either of the historic East Side mansions with a couple of friends, pretending that you’re giving them a tour of your private estates and showing off your enviable collection of 19th century oil paintings, now’s your chance.

The best – and admittedly only – bar in the city with designated axe-throwing lanes as well as shuffleboard courts, NorthSouth Club is open for business again. It’s currently limiting its group reservations to four people and is spacing visitors out so that everyone inside can practice social distancing. Walk-in appointments are sometimes available too, depending on capacity.


This story is part of Milwaukee Magazine‘s December issue.

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Lindsey Anderson covers culture for Milwaukee Magazine. Before joining the MilMag team she worked as an editor at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and wrote freelance articles for ArtSlant and Eater.