Tuesday, June 3: Death Bed: The Bed That Eats is released on Blu-Ray Call local media retailers for availability or click here to purchase. With so little on the docket early this week for moviegoers, why not take a chance on what is certainly one of the silliest movies you’ll see this calendar year? Immortalized […]

Tuesday,
June 3: Death Bed: The Bed That Eats
is released on Blu-Ray
Call
local media retailers for availability or
click here to purchase.

With so little on the docket early this week for moviegoers,
why not take a chance on what is certainly one of the silliest movies you’ll see
this calendar year? Immortalized as one of Patton Oswalt’s stand-up CD’s, Death
Bed: The Bed That Eats
, is exactly what its title proclaims— a movie
featuring a bed that eats people. I am ecstatic that such an esoteric title is
getting the blu-ray treatment, as lavish treatment for ‘low art’ allows for
reappraisals and fun cinematic analysis. Give it a shot.

***CRITIC’S CHOICE***

Friday,
June 6: The Fault in Our Stars and Edge of Tomorrow open in wide release
Check local listings for showtimes and prices.

John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has been
nothing short of a sensation in the teen fiction world, garnering critical
acclaim alongside a devoted and passionate fan base, all of whom excitedly look
toward the cinematic adaptation which makes its bow this weekend.  It’s hard not to get excited about any movie
featuring the wildly-talented Shailene Woodley (even after the massive
disappointment that was Divergent). For one to generate this
much positive buzz ahead of release is a good sign. If the movie is as good as
its source material (TFiOS is a genuine and heartbreaking
book), this is going to be a classic that teenagers will be passing on for
generations to come.


If you don’t want nuance or an abundance of emotion in your
movies this week, then check out Tom Cruise (clad in robot armor) fighting an
alien invasion in the
Groundhog Day-by-way-of-StarshipTroopers
picture
Edge of Tomorrow
Although I lament the loss of the much more appealing original title,
All You Need is Kill, this still looks like dynamic entertainment from director
Doug Liman (
Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Jumper, The Bourne Identity)
who has proven himself more than capable of crafting solid entertainment that
manages to have something to say at the same time. He has more visual wit than
many of his contemporaries, and Emily Blunt is infinitely watchable even in the
most dire of circumstances (see
The Five-Year Engagement). My hopes
are high for this one. You’ll know more
at the end of this week when my review drops. It can’t be as boring as last year’s
Oblivion, can it?

 

Friday,
June 6: For No Good Reason and Words and Pictures open at the Downer
and Oriental theaters
Check Landmark Theatres website for showtimes.

If big screen robotic mayhem or stirring teen romance isn’t going to cut it
for you, there are two limited release pictures playing at the Downer and
Oriental that will suit your more independent sensibilities.  Nobody will argue Hunter S. Thompson’s
stature as an American iconoclast, with a footprint on the way journalism operates
that still being felt to this very day. But the first image that comes to mind
when you think of Hunter? More than likely the surreal, jagged primal imagery
that belongs to his Gonzo co-conspirator Ralph Steadman, subject of the new documentary
For No Good Reason
.  Tracking his
storied career (which extends far beyond Thompson’s shadow) and giving a great
glimpse into the man’s artistic process, the documentary also features Terry
Gilliam, Johnny Depp and a host of others all forming a hallelujah chorus of
praise for this one-of-a-kind artist.

 

If more romantic fare is what you seek, consider Words
and Pictures
your utopia. Juliette Binoche is one of the great living
actresses, and having proven herself capable of bringing gravitas to the summer
blockbuster,
Godzilla, she moves into the romantic comedy genre. This also
looks to answer the question of where exactly Clive Owen has been for so many
years (beyond local Vodka billboards, that is), while showing how easy romantic
comedies can be when you pair capable performers with intelligent writing that
doesn’t condescend or collapse under a heap of clichés. Take note: Good date
night material.

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