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Monday, Sept. 1 through Wednesday, Sept. 3: UWM Union Theatre’s Fall Welcome series continues 7 p.m., see below for list of films (FREE!) We already dug deep into what UWM’s Union Theatre had in store for its returning students, but that program continues through Wednesday this week, so here is how it wraps up. Monday […]

Monday, Sept. 1 through Wednesday, Sept. 3: UWM Union Theatre’s Fall Welcome series continues
7 p.m., see below for list of films (FREE!)

We already dug deep into what UWM’s Union Theatre had in store for its returning students, but that program continues through Wednesday this week, so here is how it wraps up.

Monday at 7 p.m. Godzilla (reviewed here by yours truly)

Tuesday at 7 p.m.  The Grand Budapest Hotel (reviewed here by yours truly)

Wednesday at 7 p.m. Captain America: The Winter Soldier (reviewed here by yours truly)

Tuesday, Sept. 2: Citizen Koch released on DVD
Check local media retailers for availability or click here to purchase online.

I already spoke to this when it came back to town for a limited engagement at the Downer earlier this year, but if you missed it during that brief theatrical run, it’s being released on DVD for your home- viewing pleasure. As a reminder, Citizen Koch looks “at how the profligate private funding from billionaires flooding the political arena has turned democracy into a product for sale to the highest bidder. The film is of interest to anyone worried about the state of politics in the age of corporate influence. Knowing this film deals heavily with the battle between our governor and the unions he has sought to bust makes it appointment viewing for any impassioned Wisconsinite.”

 

Wednesday, Sept. 3: The Rains Came
7:30 p.m. @ Charles Allis Art Museum ($7/$5/free for adults/seniors and students/museum members)

Charles Allis starts to wind down its summer program of originals and remakes with this 1939 adaptation of Louis Bromfield’s novel of the same name. If you can tolerate Tyrone Power playing a Hindu doctor, maybe this tale of forbidden love between him and Myrna Loy’s character, an English woman trapped in a loveless marriage, will speak to you. Of historical note, this was the first motion picture to win an Oscar for best special effects, thanks to sequences depicting an earthquake and flood. An interesting picture to say the least.

***CRITIC’S CHOICE***

Thursday, Sept. 4 as well as Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 6-7: Do the Right Thing
7 p.m. 9/4, 5 and 7 p.m. 9/5 and 7 & 9 p.m. on 9/6 @ UWM Union Theatre (FREE!)

Spike Lee’s incendiary portrait of race relations over one fateful day in the blistering Brooklyn heat is as important of a film today as it was upon its release 25 years ago. In an era where an unarmed teenage boy can be shot to death in the middle of the street and people point to his love of rap music or possible petty theft as culpability in his execution, it’s pretty clear to me that this film retains its relevance and necessity to this very moment. It’s one of the most important American films ever made, and one you most certainly should take the time to check out if you haven’t seen before, or haven’t seen in a while, or if you aren’t watching it currently. That is to say, we should all take the time to check this out.

Friday, Sept. 5: The Big Lebowski screens as part of the Point Fish Fry and a Flick Series
Dusk-ish @ Discovery World, 500 N. Harbor Drive (FREE!)

For my money (of which there is none, as I am both poor and this is a free event) this is the best flick you can catch down at the Lakefront this year. Lebowski is my cinematic chicken soup for the soul, a movie whose restorative powers I believe in (it cheers me up when I’m sick, y’all) and whose jokes never feel tired or stale. The Coen Brothers created an amazing shaggy dog story that operates by the rules of the genre it’s taking part in, but at the same time doesn’t see that as a reason not to indulge in a bowling-themed Busby Berkeley styled dance sequence featuring Saddam Hussein and Julianne Moore dressed as a Viking queen. If you’re on this film’s wavelength, you’ll feel like it’s communicating directly to you. This is perfect fried fish/beer-drinking outdoor screening material, go forth and enjoy it.

Saturday, Sept. 6: Jurassic Park concludes the Bay View Neighborhood Committee’s ‘Film on the Hill’ series
Dusk @ Bandshell in Humboldt Park (3000 S. Howell Ave.) (FREE!)

Round out your week with one of Spielberg’s finest blockbusters, packed with unforgettable sequences and a near-perfect blend of practical and computer-generated effects (a lesson that would be well-learned by the majority of today’s summer cinema, awash in zeroes and ones) to tell this tale of scientific hubris, melting ice cream and men being eaten off of toilet seats. I reviewed the film upon its 3-D re-release, and save the bits about that conversion, the points about the film proper still stand.

 

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