Our Top 5 Picks for This Year’s Milwaukee Film Festival

We’re excited to pop some corn and watch these flicks at the virtual film festival this year.

1. Stage: The Culinary Internship

78 MINUTES | 2019

This is probably a no-brainer film for me: Stage: The Culinary Internship. It takes place in a kitchen, but not just any kitchen. Mugaritz is an internationally known restaurant in the Basque region of Spain, and it specializes in molecular gastronomy. The documentary follows 30 young chefs as they intern in the Mugaritz kitchen. One thing to know about this restaurant – which serves 20- to 30-course menus — is that the chef, Andoni Luis Aduriz, has said not all of his plates are meant to be enjoyed by diners, not in the conventional sense. It’s meant to open minds.

– Ann Christenson, Senior Dining Editor

2. One Week

24 MINUTES | 2019

From its description, One Week doesn’t sound like an uplifting film but perhaps one of redemption: It follows protagonist Errol “Iso” Ipsom for his last week in St. Louis – days he spends contemplating being separated from his two sons – before he’s incarcerated on a drug charge.

– AC

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3. A Better You

16 MINUTES | 2019

If you’re looking for some Irish dystopian steampunk action, this short film should be the pick for you. A lonely, awkward fella gets himself a clone with an AI personality that he can customize to be charming and extroverted, so he can win over a girl. You can imagine this not going well.

– Archer Parquette, Managing Editor

4. The Capote Tapes

98 MINUTES | 2019 

Recently unearthed interview tapes with Truman Capote, best known for the prototype for all true crime books In Cold Blood, reveal more about his unfinished final novel, excerpts of which caused a scandal as Capote revealed the secrets of the Manhattan elite social scene that he was part of.

– AP

5. I Used to Go Here

80 MINUTES | 2020

I’ve been a big fan of Gillian Jacobs since her star turn on “Community” (a show created by a Milwaukeean!). So I can’t wait to see her in this dramedy about a 35-year-old writer who still has some growing up to do.

– Lindsey Anderson, Senior Culture Editor

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