Monday, June 23: Point Break Dusk @ Brocach Irish Pub, 1850 N. Water St. (FREE!) Call 414-431-9009 to make reservations. If you’ve never fired your gun up in the air and went “AHHHH” then Brocach Irish Pub has you covered tonight with their patio screening of Oscar-award winning director Kathryn Bigelow’s Point Break. This story […]

Monday, June 23: Point Break
Dusk @ Brocach Irish Pub, 1850 N. Water St. (FREE!)
Call 414-431-9009 to make reservations.

If you’ve never
fired your gun up in the air and went “AHHHH” then Brocach Irish Pub has you
covered tonight with their patio screening of Oscar-award winning director
Kathryn Bigelow’s Point Break. This story of an undercover FBI agent infiltrating
a bank-robbing surfer gang is the protozoa from which other “mystic bro” films (like
the Fast
& Furious
series) evolved from. Bigelow is a wildly accomplished
filmmaker, and the kinetic action she manages here helps elevate what in other
hands could’ve been a far more laughable enterprise.


 

Wednesday, June 25: The Long Gray Line
7:30 p.m. @ Charles Allis Art Museum ($7/$5/free for
adults/seniors and students/museum members)

The spring
Tyrone Power celebration at the Charles Allis ends this week with the John Ford
military tribute The Long Gray Line. Based on the true story of Irish immigrant
Marty Maher (as portrayed by Power), the movie follows his reminiscing over his
many decades spent at West Point, starting as a civilian employee and becoming
a non-commissioned officer, earning the love and respect of cadets with names
like Patton and Eisenhower. With Ford staple Maureen O’Hara portraying his
wife, Mary O’Donnell, the film is a touching tribute to the military life and
West Point academy itself. This isn’t the apex of John Ford or Tyrone Power’s
careers, but it is fine work and well worth your time.    

 

Friday, June 27: Frozen
Dusk @ Veteran’s Memorial Park band shell at 430 N. Lake St., Port
Washington (FREE!)

The streak
continues!  This week the outdoor Frozen
screening takes place in Port Washington, so to quote myself from last week
(and the week before):

The Frozen backlash finally occurred, with attacks on its
being visually lackluster (somewhat justified) and narratively inert (musicals
let the musical numbers do the emotional heavy lifting), but now we can move
past trifling criticisms and accept that it has brought back the classic Disney
formula from the dead, something we can all agree is a good thing. It’s funny,
moving and filled with a murderer’s row of ear worms that you will be humming
for the foreseeable future.


***CRITIC’S
CHOICE***

Friday, June 27: Obvious Child opens in limited release and Transformers: Age of Extinction opens in wide release.
Check
Landmark Theaters website for Obvious
Child
showtimes and local listings for Transformers.

Your two big
Friday releases couldn’t be more different. Obvious Child has been
garnering near-unanimous praise as it’s slowly made its way toward our local
screen, with people crediting the fresh take on the romantic comedy genre and
the star-making turn from Jenny Slate in the film’s lead. Now finally comes the
chance to check it out for ourselves when it opens at the Downer Theatre this
Friday. Aspiring comedian Donna Stern gets dumped, fired and pregnant in quick
succession and finds herself stuck navigating the travails of adulthood for the
first time in her life. I’ll let you know if the hype is justified when my review
goes live later this week.

I’m unabashedly
pro-the first Transformers movie. It is overlong and filled with the excesses
one has come to know from Michael Bay, but the basic skeleton of the story in
that film is agreeable (a boy’s first car, albeit one that happens to be a
member of an ancient race of aliens who transform from robots into vehicles)
and the mayhem works in concert with the story being told. The second film is a
racist nightmare that is both narratively and visually incomprehensible. The
third mildly corrects from the nauseating course set by the second film, but
even the wholesale destruction of downtown Chicago isn’t enough to make the
film anything but an interminable slog. So what could the fourth film in this
series based on a children’s toy line, a movie series whose main goal is to
sell new and varied toys to children with each subsequent release, offer to me?

 

WAHLBERG, BABY!
Ignoring the fact that this film is a punishing near-three-hours long, the idea
of Wahlberg interacting with giant robots (and giant robot dinosaurs) will be
enough to fuel me through what will either be a punishing slog through the
heart of Michael Bay’s darkness or something moderately interesting for short
stretches of time.  Not exactly high
yield, low risk but when it comes to a movie whose trailer features a
gun-toting robot with a robotic beard and robot cigar in its mouth (1:44 mark
of the embedded trailer), it’s a plunge I’m willing to take. My only question
is this: Why wasn’t it called Trans4mers? Droppin’ the ball,
Hollywood.

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