Arts

Our critic's picks for the top 10 shows of the season.


1. After a French company caught wind of local artist Niki Johnson’s Eggs Benedict, which featured a portrait of Emeritus Pope Benedict woven from 17,000 condoms, the company bequeathed 1.2 million prophylactics that were nearing expiration. She gladly accepted and has spent the past year organizing Preservatif, which features work spun from latex by local and national artists and opens World AIDS Day. Dec 1-6. Pritzlaff Building. (DB)

2. One of the most unpredictable and lively annual exhibitions is the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Mary L. Nohl Fellowships for Individual Artists. Via the largesse of deceased artist Mary Nohl, seven artists are selected for significant funding each year in two categories, established and emerging. Their fellowship years conclude with this exhibition at INOVA (Insitute of Visual Arts). Oct. 10-Jan. 11, 2015. INOVA. (DB)

3. John Sobczak, the longtime assistant at Dean Jensen Gallery, has a unique sensibility – a little skewed and a little smart. He’s curating a fall exhibition called Independent Phrases & Subordinate Clauses. Each of the photographers showing work are hyper-aware of the categories of photography, be it documentary, commemorative or aesthetic. Their pictures offer more about the way photographs function than what they record. Oct. 17-Dec. 6. Dean Jensen Gallery. (DB)

4. There are a few Milwaukee artists who have achieved an elevated stature of true respect. Mark Mulhern is one of them, and his work – here simply titled New Paintings – keeps taking new gentle turns into the murky interior zones of experience and memory. Sept. 12-Oct. 11. Tory Folliard Gallery. (DB)


Salome by Carlo Dolci, courtesy of American Federation of Arts,
Milwaukee Art Museum

5. Of Heaven and Earth: 500 Years of Italian Painting from Glasgow Museums lands at MAM and brings with it some heavyweights of the cinquecento and onward. Although much of the museum will be closed for renovations, Botticelli’s tiny Annunciation may carry enough of a charge to lure visitors. The Virgin Mary’s impregnation is brought to vivid life with shimmery gold leaf beams. Oct. 2-Jan. 4, 2015. Milwaukee Art Museum. (DB)


The
Nugget Man’s Nugget from Feather River, California
by
Sarina Finkelstein, Tiny Tiny Group Show “Value,” courtesy of
 Tim Rodgers

6. It’s not a show at all but rather a new online exhibition space curated by Kevin Miyazaki, a well-known Milwaukee photographer. In this era of the disembodied, tinytinygroupshow certainly counts as an exciting new gallery of sorts, where regional and national artists are brought together under cleverly themed “shows.” tinytinygroupshow.com (DB)


Untitled (Wide Eyed) by Jon Horvath, courtesy of Dean Jensen Gallery

7. With geographic boundaries vanishing, regional and cultural uniqueness becomes ever more interesting. This Must be the Place invites 10 artists to contemplate the effects of specific locales, and, as always, JMKAC casts a broad net and reels in fascinating projects. Oct. 3-Feb. 22, 2015. John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan. (DB)

8. Shana McCaw has recently taken over curatorial duties at Cardinal Stritch University. A fall show there, Everyday Mysteries, puts forth the intriguing premise that hidden within the predictable routines of our lives, inexplicable sparks of magic and meaning can be found. Regional artist Emily Belknap joins photographers Grant Gill, Jon Horvath and Kyle Seis to peek at the phenomenological strangeness of being. Aug. 22-Oct. 12. Northwestern Mutual Art Gallery. (DB)

9. Paul Druecke, one of two Milwaukee artists included in this year’s prestigious Whitney Biennial, did not rest on his accomplishment but quickly poured his energies into a new project at the Lynden Sculpture Garden alongside Los Angeles artist Nancy Popp. Druecke created the site-specific Garden Path. One can walk on it while contemplating things like divisions, directions and the history of the garden’s public/private access. Through Oct. 26. Lynden Sculpture Garden. (DB)

10. Newaukee’s Night Markets initiative hopes to bring energy to a depleted zone of Milwaukee’s main Downtown artery. Initiated in July, the two remaining markets promise a few surprises, including discussions about our beloved city. Sept. 17 and Oct. 15, between Fourth and Fifth streets on Wisconsin Avenue. (DB)

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Arts


1. After a French company caught wind of local artist Niki Johnson’s Eggs Benedict, which featured a portrait of Emeritus Pope Benedict woven from 17,000 condoms, the company bequeathed 1.2 million prophylactics that were nearing expiration. She gladly accepted and has spent the past year organizing Preservatif, which features work spun from latex by local and national artists and opens World AIDS Day. Dec 1-6. Pritzlaff Building. (DB)

2. One of the most unpredictable and lively annual exhibitions is the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Mary L. Nohl Fellowships for Individual Artists. Via the largesse of deceased artist Mary Nohl, seven artists are selected for significant funding each year in two categories, established and emerging. Their fellowship years conclude with this exhibition at INOVA (Insitute of Visual Arts). Oct. 10-Jan. 11, 2015. INOVA. (DB)

3. John Sobczak, the longtime assistant at Dean Jensen Gallery, has a unique sensibility – a little skewed and a little smart. He’s curating a fall exhibition called Independent Phrases & Subordinate Clauses. Each of the photographers showing work are hyper-aware of the categories of photography, be it documentary, commemorative or aesthetic. Their pictures offer more about the way photographs function than what they record. Oct. 17-Dec. 6. Dean Jensen Gallery. (DB)

4. There are a few Milwaukee artists who have achieved an elevated stature of true respect. Mark Mulhern is one of them, and his work – here simply titled New Paintings – keeps taking new gentle turns into the murky interior zones of experience and memory. Sept. 12-Oct. 11. Tory Folliard Gallery. (DB)


Salome by Carlo Dolci, courtesy of American Federation of Arts,
Milwaukee Art Museum

5. Of Heaven and Earth: 500 Years of Italian Painting from Glasgow Museums lands at MAM and brings with it some heavyweights of the cinquecento and onward. Although much of the museum will be closed for renovations, Botticelli’s tiny Annunciation may carry enough of a charge to lure visitors. The Virgin Mary’s impregnation is brought to vivid life with shimmery gold leaf beams. Oct. 2-Jan. 4, 2015. Milwaukee Art Museum. (DB)


The
Nugget Man’s Nugget from Feather River, California
by
Sarina Finkelstein

6. It’s not a show at all but rather a new online exhibition space curated by Kevin Miyazaki, a well-known Milwaukee photographer. In this era of the disembodied, tinytinygroupshow certainly counts as an exciting new gallery of sorts, where regional and national artists are brought together under cleverly themed “shows.” tinytinygroupshow.com (DB)


Untitled (Wide Eyed) by Jon Horvath, courtesy of Dean Jensen Gallery

7. With geographic boundaries vanishing, regional and cultural uniqueness becomes ever more interesting. This Must be the Place invites 10 artists to contemplate the effects of specific locales, and, as always, JMKAC casts a broad net and reels in fascinating projects. Oct. 3-Feb. 22, 2015. John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan. (DB)

8. Shana McCaw has recently taken over curatorial duties at Cardinal Stritch University. A fall show there, Everyday Mysteries, puts forth the intriguing premise that hidden within the predictable routines of our lives, inexplicable sparks of magic and meaning can be found. Regional artist Emily Belknap joins photographers Grant Gill, Jon Horvath and Kyle Seis to peek at the phenomenological strangeness of being. Aug. 22-Oct. 12. Northwestern Mutual Art Gallery. (DB)

9. Paul Druecke, one of two Milwaukee artists included in this year’s prestigious Whitney Biennial, did not rest on his accomplishment but quickly poured his energies into a new project at the Lynden Sculpture Garden alongside Los Angeles artist Nancy Popp. Druecke created the site-specific Garden Path. One can walk on it while contemplating things like divisions, directions and the history of the garden’s public/private access. Through Oct. 26. Lynden Sculpture Garden. (DB)

10. Newaukee’s Night Markets initiative hopes to bring energy to a depleted zone of Milwaukee’s main Downtown artery. Initiated in July, the two remaining markets promise a few surprises, including discussions about our beloved city. Sept. 17 and Oct. 15, between Fourth and Fifth streets on Wisconsin Avenue. (DB)

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